Sabrina Carr - Stoneham MA Real Estate, Reading MA Real Estate, Lynnfield MA Real Estate


This Single-Family in Lynnfield, MA recently sold for $615,000. This style home was sold by Sabrina Carr - William Raveis R.E. & Home Services.


Lynnfield, MA 01940

Single-Family

$559,900
Price
$615,000
Sale Price

8
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Enjoy the charm of this modern carriage house the moment you enter the 4-season sunroom.This bonus space offers café shutters & french-doors that lead into the spacious living room, which has a beautiful stained glass window & natural light. Love to entertain? A gorgeous kitchen awaits, featuring large island, granite counters, SS appliances, gas range, under cabinet & recessed lights, vaulted ceiling & skylights. The dining room is perfect for gathering, flowing off the kitchen & anchored by bright bay windows. Wood floors, laundry & shiplapped ½ bath complete this level. The 2nd floor offers 3 bedrooms, new windows & a modern full bath, boasting an updated vanity w/white granite counters & newly glazed tub. Retreat to your yard or the deck w/maintenance free, composite flooring. You'll appreciate the newer tankless heating system, 2-car garage, ample parking, shed & recent upgrade to public sewer! Entrance on Lookout Ter. Located close to major Rtes, MarketStreet, top schools & more!

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Photo by u_jup1hbno via Pixabay

Paint is the magic elixir when it comes to inexpensive home makeovers. It rejuvenates space in a way few other things can do. Yet many homeowners have blinders on when it comes to the places they can paint. Namely, they only see the walls as a palette. Let's challenge that notion and remind you of a new way to use paint -- on cabinets.

Step One: Prepping

Whatever you do, don't skip step one — prepping. Though tempting to overlook, the risks of ruining your cabinetry if you do are simply too high.

To prep your cabinets, begin by labeling each cabinet opening and door front with corresponding numbers marked on painter's tape. This will save you countless headaches when it comes time to reinstall. You'll remove the labels before spraying with primer and paint, and then replace the tape when you're ready for reinstallation. You can place the labels just above wherever you've set the pieces to dry so you don't lose track.

Remove all hardware, including hinges and screws. If you're getting new hardware, it likely won't align properly, so be prepared to redo these holes later.

Wipe each cabinet front with a bonding solvent. Allow 1 1/2 hours of drying time before troweling a thin layer of spackling compound over the entire surface to fill holes, blemishes and wood grain pores. Use a second coat if deep holes are evident.

Next, it's time to sand. Doing so eliminates any existing sheen or protective sealant from your cabinets, thereby allowing primer and paint to bond appropriately to the surface. Fine-grit sanding blocks or pads work best for most cabinet and drawer fronts; however, rough-grit sandpaper is acceptable for cabinets with a lot of lacquer or shellac.

Step Two: Add Primer

After vacuuming or wiping down the cabinets, add primer using pigmented shellac sealer and a 2-inch brush. Pour about 1 1/2- inches of your primer into a small can and dip the brush about 1-inch. Press the brush against the side of the can to remove excess primer. Don’t wipe it across the rim, as this removes too much primer. Shellac dries quickly, so move fast and avoid going back over areas that have started to dry. Try to avoid heavy buildup and runs, but don't be overly concerned with uneven patches.

Step Three: Paint

Brush on the first coat of paint, then smooth it out with just the tip of the brush. Follow each layer by sanding lightly using a fine-grit sanding sponge.Allow at least 8 hours for each layer to dry before going over it again. Work from top to bottom to avoid dripping on finished areas. Likewise, paint the insides of the cabinets before moving to the outside. If any paint spills onto a finished area, simply dab it with a cloth dampened with mineral spirits.

Step Four: Reinstall Hardware

Finally, it's time to reinstall door hinges, handles, pulls, mounting plates, and other hardware removed for the project. Once this is complete, attach the door fronts and reset the cabinets in place.

Getting ready for a move or remodel can be stressful. Call, email or use the contact form on the site to schedule a consultation today.


As a first-time home seller, it can be tough to establish a competitive price for your residence. And if you set a price that is too high or too low, you risk alienating potential homebuyers or missing out on an opportunity to maximize the value of your house.

Ultimately, there's a lot to think about as you determine the price for your residence. Lucky for you, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of pricing your home, regardless of the current housing market's conditions.

Let's take a look at three tips to help first-time home sellers set a competitive price for a residence.

1. Study the Real Estate Market

How does your residence stack up against similar houses that are currently available in your city or town? Study the real estate market, and you can find out how your residence compares to the competition.

Evaluate the prices of currently available houses in your city or town. With this housing market data in hand, you can learn how your home ranks against the competition and establish a price range for houses that are similar to your own.

Also, examine the prices of recently sold houses in your area. By doing so, you can find out whether you're about to enter a seller's market or a buyer's market and map out your home selling journey accordingly.

2. Perform a Home Appraisal

A home appraisal can make a world of difference, particularly for a first-time home seller who is uncertain about how to upgrade a residence.

During a home appraisal, a property inspector will examine a home's interior and exterior. After the appraisal is finished, this inspector will provide a home seller with a report that outlines his or her findings.

Take the results of a home appraisal seriously – you'll be glad you did. The appraisal enables a home seller to learn about a home's strengths and weaknesses, and as a result, discover the best ways to transform assorted weaknesses into strengths. Then, a home seller can perform myriad home upgrades and may be better equipped than ever before to optimize the value of a house.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent analyzes housing market patterns and trends closely and is happy to share home selling insights at any time. Thus, this housing market professional can help a home seller establish a competitive price for a home from the get-go.

Moreover, a real estate agent will promote a home to the right groups of homebuyers and work with a home seller at each stage of the property selling journey. He or she will even negotiate with homebuyers on a seller's behalf to increase the likelihood that a seller can get the best price for a residence.

When it comes to selling a home for the first time, there is no need to leave anything to chance. Use the aforementioned tips, and a first-time home seller can set a competitive price for a house and increase his or her chances of a quick home sale.


As a homebuyer, you'll want to do everything possible to guarantee a quick, seamless homebuying journey. Because if you're not careful, you may be forced to deal with a nightmare homebuying experience.

Ultimately, there are many ways to ensure that you can avoid a nightmare homebuying experience, such as:

1. Narrow Your Home Search

Although you know that you want to buy a home, it pays to consider exactly what you'd like to find in your ideal residence. By doing so, you can narrow your home search and avoid the homebuying nightmare of pursuing residences that fail to meet your expectations.

Think about which features are must-haves for your new home, as well as which features you can afford to live without.

For example, if you require a home that is close to your office, you can search for houses near your workplace. On the other hand, if you want to live in a small town, you can remove city residences from your home search.

Establish priorities as you search for your dream house – you'll be glad you did. If you separate your home must-haves from your wants, you can simplify your home search and move one step closer to finding your ideal residence.

2. Get Your Finances in Order

How much can you afford to spend on a house? Create a homebuying budget, and you can avoid the risk of browsing available residences that fall outside your price range.

To determine how much money you have available for a home purchase, it often helps to meet with local banks and credit unions. These financial institutions can provide details about a variety of mortgage options and help you select a mortgage that corresponds to your finances.

Also, you should check your credit report before you buy a home. You are entitled to a free annual copy of your credit report from each of the three credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion). Take advantage of this perk, and you can learn your credit score and take steps to improve it prior to purchasing a house.

3. Hire an Experienced Real Estate Agent

An experienced real estate agent understands both the homebuyer's and home seller's perspectives. As such, this housing market professional can help you analyze a home seller's point of view and negotiate the best price on any home, at any time.

Typically, an experienced real estate agent will meet with you and learn about your homebuying goals. This housing market professional then will map out a homebuying journey, one that helps you streamline the process of acquiring your ideal house.

Let's not forget about the assistance that an experienced real estate agent can deliver throughout the homebuying journey, either. A real estate agent can provide expert insights into the housing market and help you make informed decisions, thereby reducing the risk of a nightmare homebuying experience.

Take the guesswork out of buying a home – use the aforementioned tips, and you can minimize the risk of a nightmare homebuying experience.


Receiving a low offer on a home can be frustrating for a seller. But, you’re likely to see at least one or two offers on your property that are lower than you would like.

Right now, the housing market is filled with young professionals burdened with student loans, rising costs of living, and stagnating wages. So, it’s no wonder that they’re trying to save money anywhere they can.

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about what to do when you get a low offer so you can set yourself up for a sale that you’re happy with.

Don’t refuse outright

The first thing to know about low offers is that they can sometimes turn into something that both you and the buyer are happy with. Many successful home sales started at a number that the seller considered too low, but--through negotiation--was brought to a higher price and better deal overall.

Many sellers are uncomfortable with the idea of negotiation. Most people seldom negotiate prices unless they are buying a car, and even then would prefer to avoid the hassle.

For others, negotiation is a normal part of everyday life. Flatout refusing an offer, especially if you aren’t receiving many other higher offers, could be a missed opportunity.

Compare your asking price with similar homes nearby

Odds are that you and your agent have already done your research and found an asking price that is comparable in your neighborhood. But home prices fluctuate. To reassure yourself that your asking price is fair, take another look at homes up for sale that are around the same age and size of your home.

Take time to craft a counteroffer

Once you’ve had time to talk the offer over with your family and real estate agent (and maybe vented a bit), it’s time to come up with a counteroffer.

There are a few options for making a counteroffer that don’t involve significantly lowering the amount you stand to gain from the home sale. First, you could offer to relieve the buyer of some of the closing costs, such as paying for the inspection. Or, if you planned on leaving new appliances in the home, you could lower your asking price but take the appliances when you move.

Weigh your options

If the buyer still won’t raise their offer close to your asking price, it’s probably a good time to move on and rethink your sale strategy.

Take some time to consider the sale as a whole. If you aren’t receiving many other offers, it might be time to consider lowering to price or rethinking your marketing plan. You might consider repainting and taking new photos, or changing up your listing to highlight some other features of the house.




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